TEN Smartest Dog Breeds

Discussion in 'Food and Nutrition' started by niluraj01, Mar 6, 2017.

  1. niluraj01

    niluraj01 New Member

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    Intelligent dogs are an excellent addition to any home. However, their intelligence brings a responsibility into your life. You need to keep smart dogs busy and happy all the time. An intelligent dog who becomes bored can become destructive and can be a problem barker. If you have time and inclination, your life will be enhanced by owning any of these smart dogs.

    1. German Shepherd
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    The German Shepherd was first bred to be a herding dog. As the need for herding dogs has decreased, the intelligence of the German Shepherd has allowed it to branch out into protection roles and service dog activities.


    The German Shepherd is a big and muscular dog, and obedience training is essential. The German Shepherd will bond with their primary handler and will want to be with them as much as possible. German Shepherds will tolerate older children who are respectful, but small children may ruffle them.
    2. Border Collie
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    Border Collies are usually considered to be the most intelligent dog that can solve problems without human assistance. They love to perform tricks and are perfectly suited for agility training.
    Owning a Border Collie is a full-time job, though. You will need to ensure that they have enough challenges to stop them becoming bored. If an intelligent dog like this becomes bored, they will make their own fun and become very destructive in the process.
    It is in their blood to want to herd sheep so you will need to consider how they may react to your children and your other pets. If this dog is bored then nipped heels, stressed chickens and anxious cats may be the result. They are not suited for apartments or houses with small yards. A rural setting would suit them best, but a large yard would be enough.

    3. Shetland Sheepdog

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    The Shetland Sheepdog, also renowned as a Sheltie, resembles a small version of a Collie. They are very playful and excel at games such as Flyball. They are quick and graceful and need more exercise than the average small dog.
    They feel happy in the suburbs with a big yard, or on a farm. Apartment living is not a good idea for a Shetland Sheepdog. Shelties are not suitable for families with small children due to their sensitivity to loud noises and rough handling. The Sheltie’s coat sheds heavily, so frequent grooming is needed.
    4. Poodle
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    The Poodle is a loving and clever dog. They are playful and energetic and do not like to be left alone for long periods. Your Poodle would be a happy dog who likes to be involved in family matters.
    They are great with kids and other pets, and usually, build a close relationship with one member of the household. If you live in an apartment, the Poodle will adapt well. They do not shed too much but do require grooming. A professional groomer every six weeks would be recommended.
    Do not spoil your poodle. A spoiled poodle can be nervous and demanding. As long as you train your poodle like any other dog and keep a sense of discipline, there should not be a problem.

    5. Golden Retriever
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    The beautiful Golden Retriever is a friendly and loyal dog who is excellent as a service dog. The Golden Retriever shines in agility and obedience tasks.
    Goldies are first and foremost retrievers and will try to drag or pull anything that can fit in their mouths. They love water and will happily keep you company while you splash around in the lake.
    The Golden Retriever is a family dog who will get on happily with your children and other pets. They will bark at strangers and then lick them to death. They have a tendency to gain weight, so daily exercise and careful feeding are essential.

    6. Doberman Pinscher
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    The Doberman was bred as a protection dog and is cast in this role in the movies whenever an attack dog is needed. In real life, they are extremely loyal and playful. They are perfect for a family that they can grow up with, but they need to be sufficiently socialized. The Doberman will be naturally protective of your family.


    Dobies crave exercise each day. If they do not receive enough exercise, they may become irritable. They can be adapted to apartment living as long as they get the required daily exercise.
    7. Labrador Retriever
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    The Labrador Retriever, known simply as a Labrador, is a short-haired version of the Golden Retriever. Like his cousin, the Labrador is extremely smart, loyal and playful. The Labrador is gentle and affectionate and makes a lovely family dog.
    You will need to keep an eye on your Labrador’s food intake. They love their food and are prone to gaining weight. Your other pets will be safe with a Labrador. Your Labrador will bark to warn you of strangers, but then will invite them in.
    Labradors love to be off the lead for a while during their daily walks. They also love water so keep an eye on them in case they try to enter any unknown water without permission.

    8. Australian Cattle Dog
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    The Australian Cattle dog, known as the Blue Heeler, is a very hardworking and alert dog. He is loyal and protective. If the Australian Cattle dogs are well socialized when they are young, they will be respectful of your children and other pets.
    In general, the Australian Cattle dogs prefer to be the only dog in the household. They consider themselves to be part of the family and will supervise all family activities. They need daily exercise and thrive when they have a ‘job.’ The Heeler loves his agility and flyball competitions and is keen to catch a flying disc from you.
    9. Papillon
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    The Papillon is a toy breed, growing to around 8 to 11 inches. The Papillon is a happy, lively dog. If you are looking for a placid lapdog, the Papillon is not for you. They are extremely active and constantly on the move.
    They are well suited to training in obedience and agility, but also love a game of fetch, especially with a squeaky toy. Papillons are not good for families with small children. They are incredibly sensitive to being touched. They are fragile and can be injured if they are stepped on or sat on.
    On the other hand, the Papillon seems to think he is bigger than he is, and may get himself into trouble with larger dogs. Their confidence could also cause them to jump out of your arms and injure themselves in the fall. The Papillon needs regular brushing. The long hair on the ears can become matted without consistent attention.
    If you want a bright and trainable toy breed, and you have the time to keep your pup busy, and the type of household that will keep them safe, then the Papillon could be for you.
    10. Rottweiler
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    You will need to consider your other pets. Some Rotties can live happily with cats, but others will see them as prey. They will also be prone to striving to the top of the pecking order with your other dogs. The Rottweiler is an excellent companion, but without training and supervision, they may be too much to handle.
    Smart dogs are not for every family. Like intelligent people, intelligent dogs can cause lots of trouble. If you want to own a smart puppy, make sure you have enough time to spend with him or her. It is a long-term commitment.
     
  2. Ashley Holmes

    Ashley Holmes New Member

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    Thank you for this post. Now I know what to get next for my family.
    Are German Shepherds safe if you have kids at home?
     
  3. niluraj01

    niluraj01 New Member

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    Are German Shepherds Good With Kids Babies, Families and Other Pets?

    In an attempt to answer the above questions for you, we will run through the German Shepherd temperament, 5 tips for raising a good family German Shepherd, as well as specific considerations for a scenario where you introduce a GSD to children kids babies, a family or other pets, such as dogs and cats.

    German Shepherd Temperament Are German Shepherds Nice and Safe?

    The Ultimate Guide To German Shepherd Dogs and Puppies at The Daily Shep contains a good summary of the German Shepherd’s temperament and characteristics as a dog breed.

    You should know that the GSD is the second most popular domestic dog breed among dog owners in the US.

    You should also know that German Shepherds are were bred for their ‘obedient fidelity to their master’ and other family members.

    They tend to be very loving and protective towards the people they spend the most time with, especially kids, babies and young children who they are quick to befriend.

    They are naturally wary around unfamiliar humans and animals.

    It is important to note that whilst the above is the natural tendency of the GSD breed, there are several factors that an owner has a direct influence on that play a part in ensuring their dog develops and maintains a good temperament, particularly in a family environment.
     
  4. niluraj01

    niluraj01 New Member

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    Top 4 Tips For Bringing A German Shepherd Into Your Family Information For Parents and Kids
    The following factors are your responsibility, and are in your control as a German Shepherd owner to determine what sort of German Shepherd you have in, or bring into your family:

    1) Early Socialisation As A Puppy

    Socialize your GSD early (from 8 weeks old) and often as a puppy. Ring up your local dog association or German Shepherd club and find the nearest puppy school to you.

    Socializing your GSD is important for two reasons

    It teaches you GSD from a young age that most other humans and animals are a positive experience for them to enjoy
    You can teach your GSD while they are not fully developed what are acceptable behaviors around other humans and animals e. g. biting nipping, jumping and chewing are bad.
    When you socialize your GSD with other dogs in non controlled environments like walking your GSD, or taking it to the dog park, always ask the other owner and approach the other animal slowly to determine if it has any aggressive tendencies.

    2) Early and Consistent Obedience and Training

    A German Shepherd who is going to spend time around kids, families and other pets need a solid foundation of obedience and training so it knows how to behave, and how to communicate with you as their owner.

    It’s a good idea to teach basic voice commands like ‘Sit’, ‘Stay’, ‘Lay Down’, ‘Stop’ and ‘Come’.

    Read more about How To Train A German Shepherd at The Daily Shep for tips and advice.

    3) Regular Exercise and Mental Stimulation

    German Shepherds are a highly athletic and intelligent breed of dog. If they don’t get daily exercise and the opportunity to exercise their minds, it can lead to frustration and naughty behavior from excess energy chewing, jumping etc.

    Take them outside for at least half hour to an hour a day, and ensure they can keep their minds occupied throughout the day. What do German Shepherds like to play with you might ask?

    Dog Toys (balls, chew toys, ropes, anything which gives their mouths and brains a workout!), bones (important for cleaning teeth) and socialization (playing with you) if possible.

    4) Establish Yourself As A Firm But Calm Leader

    The best dog owners are able to firmly establish rules, boundaries, and limitations for their German Shepherds both in training and around the household in terms of behavior.

    But, they do it in a positive, patient, calm and caring way never negative or forceful (shouting, showing frustration, hitting etc.). This earns their dog’s respect, attention, and loyalty.

    German Shepherds prior to domestication were pack animals, which means they sought the dominant leader role to protect the pack’s welfare.

    You GSD will still seek to protect you and your family members, but you have to show them you are the leader of being consistent with your discipline and love.

    A GSD who respects its owner will rarely disappoint them with their expectations or disobey commands.
     
  5. niluraj01

    niluraj01 New Member

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    Are German Shepherds Good With Kids, Babies and Young Children?

    What you must consider about a German Shepherd around babies, kids, and small children is that they are a large breed of dog.

    Sometimes they don’t understand their own strength and can be a little clumsy when playing or greeting you, especially as puppies or adolescents young dogs.

    A well trained GSD that respects respected owner would never intentionally hurt a member of the family, but a little extra training and care may have to be put into making sure your GSD understands the boundaries of play when dealing with small humans.

    Teaching your German Shepherd key voice commands listed above and in general not to jump will be helpful. Read more about training for German Shepherd Jumping at The Daily Shep.

    If you have a GSD and are thinking about bringing a baby into the family, you should start training your GSD for the arrival of a baby before it happens.

    Dogatheart(.)com suggests you can train your GSD for the arrival of a baby by wrapping up a baby doll in a blanket and doing the following:

    Use the doll and stroller while walking your GSD and teach them how to act around the stroller.
    Use the doll in the car in the car seat and your GSD to help train how to act in the vehicle.
    Use the doll to teach your GSD “no barking” during sleep time.
    Use the doll for your GSD to teach them not to go into the baby’s room.
    Use the doll for feeding time, and just baby and parent time.
    Once your GSD is comfortable with the doll, leave the doll in the lounge with your GSD to see how it acts
    If your GSD is used to socializing with all types of people from a young age, including young children, it shouldn’t have any issues with getting comfortable with a baby.

    If you intend of driving with your baby or newborn in the car in a baby car seat, read more about German Shepherd In Car Training and Tips at The Daily Shep so you can ensure everyone keeps safe.

    Are German Shepherds Good Family Dogs?

    German Shepherds are good with children and good with other animals in most instances, but in terms of being a family dog, consider your lifestyle and the requirements of a GSD.

    A GSD makes a great family dog because they are loving and loyal around those they spend time with the most. They will also protect your house against intruders and threats!

    But, they require daily exercise, mental stimulation, socialization and of course the standard cost of owning a dog (vet fees, food, training, equipment, registration etc.). Consider the following questions and whether you can answer ‘Yes’ to them:

    Can you spare an hour to the half hour daily?
    Can you ensure you provide your GSD with enough things to do while you are at work?
    Are you able to ensure your GSD gets to spend time socializing with humans daily?
    German Shepherds shed…alot. Are you OK with the extra hair around the house?
    Can you afford a few thousand dollars every year for the health and care of your GSD, plus any unexpected fees like operations of expert advice?
    GSD puppies may seem cute and cool, but remember a dog is a daily and lifelong investment responsibility of your time and money. You’ll be repaid with love of course!

    Are German Shepherds Good With Other Dogs and Family Pets?

    Yes, as long as you teach them to co exist with other animals as a puppy. Socialization helps with this.

    If you bring another dog or animals into the family after your get your GSD, you may have to consider isolating them from each other at first if there are some unfamiliarity and naturally territorial behavior.

    A retractable indoor pet gate can isolate smaller animals, but for a German Shepherd who can jump and scale even 6 8 foot walls, a dog crate may be a better idea for isolation, as long as it is not used to punish your GSD.



    You can then gradually start introducing them to each other (on a leash to begin with) until they are able to behave in a positive way consistently under your supervision.

    This may take a lot of patience and training, so it’s always a good idea to take your current GSD to meet any potential animal housemates beforehand to see what you’re dealing with.
     
    #5 niluraj01, Mar 9, 2017
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2017
  6. Ashley Holmes

    Ashley Holmes New Member

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    Hi Niluraj01,

    Thank you for that very insightful post. It really helps a lot. Now I am relieved that they will be loving and loyal pets.
    I have always wanted a Germand Shepherd as a pet, but I am wondering how to take care of it properly. I also have a trauma of Parvo because I lost one of my pups because of it.
    Are they prone to Parvo as well?

    Thanks in advance!
     
  7. pdgal

    pdgal New Member

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    Nice post - although sometimes I question my dog's intelligence....she tried to run through the dog door with a stick that was too wide and catapulted backwards. Luckily not hurt - just surprised. Haha! :D
     
  8. Emmabarnes

    Emmabarnes New Member

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    Yes i agree with you, these are some of the smartest dog breeds, I have a golden retriever and really is one of the smartest pets I have ever seen.
     

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