Let them live a comfortable & happy life as long as possible. Chemo extends life only a few months.

Discussion in 'Your Best Dog Cancer Advice...' started by Elaine, May 3, 2017.

  1. Elaine

    Elaine New Member

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    Rather than the agonizing & depressing cancer treatments , let your dog live his life.

    Increase supplements known to help their pain, spirit, & strength.
    Give them appropriate food, never food that is inferior. Expensive food requires less feedings & is more satisfying.

    Always have clean ( filtered, bottled, even distilled water) for them. And Love Them.
     
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  2. Elaine

    Elaine New Member

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  3. Lindal

    Lindal New Member

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    Elaine, I totally agree with you. My dog Holly had lymphoma and was diagnosed on Febr
    Elaine, I agree with you 100 percent. Our dog Holly was diagnosed with lymphoma on February 15 of this year. She was 9 years old. I have a great vet and he told me that there is no cure just an extension of her life with chemo. Do I want to do it for her and make her go through hell and just prolong the inevitable or give her the best last few months of her life. We put her on prdiszone which help her get through some rough time, but that was it. Her days were filled with the food she loved and treats. She loved sitting on the patio and just watching the birds, so that is what we did. I made everyday the best day it could be for her. She got really sick on May 10 in the morning and we knew it was time. I am crying my eyes out typing this, but knowing that I did the right thing for her.I did not want her last days to be just about chemo and going back and forth to the vet. I wish you the best.
     
    Mz. Mary, lucy and 4-year old Bruno like this.
  4. lucy

    lucy New Member

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    I agree with you Elaine. My little Joey has bone cancer in his back leg. He is almost 13. Amputate the leg?
    This will only give him a few more months. Give him a quality life to the end. When he is overcome with pain
    we will help him go. Heartbreaking but the right thing to do. Lucy
     
  5. Mz. Mary

    Mz. Mary New Member

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    Hi Family, Thank you for your advice, I agree with you fully. Can you please let me know what supplements you gave your baby for pain?
     
  6. Mz. Mary

    Mz. Mary New Member

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  7. Jane&Dexter

    Jane&Dexter New Member

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    Hi I am new to this forum and agree with the above comments completely. However, every dog's cancer is different. I was determined not to put my boy through any horrible treatments but when we got the diagnosis of anal gland cancer October 2017 and told he had less than 2 months to live we were devastated. Dexter has had major surgery and we are currently just over half way through chemotherapy treatment. His first treatment left him with horrendous side effects and I felt so guilty but the dose was reduced and he is now symptom free. The surgery and chemo are hopefully going to give us another 18 months and right now Dexter is normal, energised chasing around the field with his other Labrador mates. So, my point being chemotherapy is not for everyone and doesn't always help that much but sometimes can help. We had a great Christmas with Dexter and without the treatments he would have been already gone.
     
  8. Valeria Carvalho

    Valeria Carvalho New Member

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    Hello my baby was a westie and would complete 13 years on July 27 this month. One week ago he was diagnosed with a very aggressive lymphoma, which prevented him from eating, and drinking water, and hindering his breath... Yesterday he was gone...And this is the most terrible experience I've ever had! Your companion, also Westie, this inconsolable... He walks around the house looking for him all day. Despite my pain, I am giving her a lot of attention, keeping her walking routine and playing with her, but I wonder if anyone has experienced this experience and could give me some tips What to do so that she does not suffer too much!
    Thank you a lot
     
  9. TheCure

    TheCure New Member

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    I am terribly sorry for your loss
     
  10. TheCure

    TheCure New Member

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    Hello my dog Sadie is a black lab, just found her pic as a pup 2/28/06...wow

    She was diagnosed with a softball size mass on her spleen 1/17/2018
    SADIE3.jpg
    Just went back today (1/29/2018) and here is what we got
    SADIE5.jpg

    I can feel an obvious change just below her ribcage on her right side.

    This is supposed to be some form of splenic cancer, and ive been treating her without chemo or surgery. Is this really going down?
     
  11. TheCure

    TheCure New Member

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    OK so I think I figured it out with these pics.
    this first pic is the first visit SADIE4.jpg

    second visit
    SADIE6.jpg

    if anyone is good at looking at these, your input is HIGHLY appreciated. She is still pain free, has been eating more, and her energy levels are better than they've been in a few years
     
  12. Patti CB

    Patti CB New Member

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    Hi folks. I will post about our experience with the hope that it may help/comfort some of you out there. My 8-9 year old Japanese Chin (Mushu) had a lump removed 1/10/2-19 just to the right of the base of his tail. We adopted him from a shelter when he was a puppy. Originally thought to be a cyst but vet interpreted the pathology report as apocrine gland adenocacinoma of the anal sac (perianal) - worst day of me life when I heard that - but later determined by the radiation Rx/oncology vet to be a lesser virulent tumor more of the soft tissue than the anal gland. Still risk of spread but lower and slower. We brought him to the regional vet medical center near us (Springfield VA) on Monday, a wonderful and brilliant radiation Rx/oncologist vet spent 2+ hours with us. CT scan next week to see if any spread to lymph and lungs, surgical margins were not 100% clear and some cells noted at margins. Mushu looks as healthy, active and playful as can be. No palpable enlarged/hard lymph nodes. Hoping that no nodes are noted on lymph or lungs but that doesn't rule out some "floating" cancer cells that just have not clumped together into a nodule yet for detection by CT scan. We plan to start him on low dose/longterm chemotherapy (pill) to reduce/delay (and stop if possible) the risk of spread. Dr G said not all tumors spread even if they have been know to do so. In some cases, the tumor becomes encapsulated or the cells just stay in the primary site..or the immune system somehow "steps up to kick the tumor's butt to the ground" (such as what happens with the newer biological chemo drugs in humans). Cancer is still a mystery. He also said that the dose used for low dose/longterm chemo Rx is only a fraction of what is used for humans and expected side effects in general are predictable, manageable, and in some cases preventable. Not a steroid. We can re-evaluate at anytime, we are looking at doing so in 6 month intervals. If nearby lymph node positive, with Dr G's support we may consider a short Rx with radiation (eg 5 treatments over several weeks) to the lymph nodes in addition to the low dose chemo Rx. The low dose/long-term chemo Rx should help with both local and systemic disease spread. We opted against the more aggressive and costly radiation (daily MF X 15 treatments) and IV/IM chemo Rx for the moment. I have also put Mushu on the canine cancer support diet (lean meats, lots of veggies, low carbs)...based upon the fact that tumor cells like carbs/sugar...never thought my dog would love veggies but he is licking his bowl clean (and the nearby floor too). I may end up putting the whole family on this diet (only partially kidding). Fresh/frozen veggies (broccoli, cauliflower, sweet potatoes, squash, kale, spinach, pumpkin, carrots) and hormone-free ground poultry/stew beef is cheaper than fancy dog food!! Mushu's new food is popular with his dog sister so I am feeding it to my 9 year old, overweight Shih Tzu too with vet's OK. Discovered that a dollop of canned organic pumpkin or sweet potato (both pro-immune function and anti-cancer) will hide the taste/odor of broccoli or cauliflower and fake out the dogs. Vet gave us the full OK for the new diet, just adding dog vitamins also. Vet recommended staying with mandatory dog vaccines (eg rabies) and pre-procedure antibiotic prior to any dental cleaning for Mushu once he starts his chemo Rx. We do have a holistic vet near us, and when I can catch my breath from all this damn drama I will seek her advice on any additional supplements that could have a immune support/anti-cancer function that can be used in additional to the above Rx. I am told that I can get those on Amazon Prime or at Whole Foods (also at Wegmans). Given his age now (although he stills acts like a puppy) our goal is to have Mushu live his expected lifespan with quality. He may die with cancer but I am hoping that he won't die because of it. It may be wishful thinking but so be it. We got him a St Francis of Assisi (patron saint of pets/animals) medal and an angel medal to wear on his harness, which one of the local priests blessed for us (he too has a dog). I may not be the best Catholic but it makes me feel better to know he has wears them (I believe dogs go to heaven along with other beloved pets) A friend who is a grief therapist suggested that we try to do a random act of kindness each day to redirect our thoughts in a more positive manner. Last week we bought/brought dry dog and cat food to the local shelter to help those affected by the federal furlough who are finding it hard to bear the cost of feeding their pets. Those "kindness" endorphins do the trick better than a glass of booze and we now feel better about life. I teach in the healthcare field, and used to be an oncology nurse. Dug deep into the research literature to see what I could find about canine cancer,. From what I read, neither chemo or radiation Rx in dogs is considered a first line 100% curative Rx, the doses needed to do so would impact on their quality of life too much that we wouldn't tolerate it on our fur babies. However, on the premise that cancer can be both an acute and chronic disease, there may be a role for some degree of radiation or chemo Rx (depending upon tumor type) in controlling (not curing) the disease and prolonging a life that still has quality and comfort. We are starting to think this way in human medicine too, such as the new drugs for metastatic lung or breast cancer to hold the disease at its current stage for a while. In the end, a dog owner may (or may not) still have to face a difficult decision regarding euthanasia but that is not just limited to dogs with cancer. That could also be the case of an aging but otherwise healthy dog who has reached his/her canine limit on earth. Finally, my kids reminded me that dogs live in the present, not the future, and that they don't need to live 70+ years like us because (hopefully, with the right forever family) a dog's life is endless fun, love and happiness...their full, brief life is filled with nothing but good stuff. In a stable and secure loving setting, dogs don't sweat and stress over the details and "potentials" like we do. The kids also reminded me how resilient and adaptable our Shih Tzu was when she went blind from SARDS 2 years ago. Unless you move my furniture, you wouldn't know that she is blind. Hang in there. My fingers are crossed for all of us and our beloved dogs. And Mushu is going to have a piece of bacon daily if he wants from here on in. Patti CB .
     

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